Archive for 2001

Cloud Forest Fading in the Mist, Their Treasures Little Known

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 13, 2001   View Article

They are nature’s “water towers,” providing billions of gallons of fresh, clean, filtered water. They are home to thousands of indigenous peoples, and storehouses of biodiversity, at least 80 percent of which has not yet been catalogued.

Yet in as little as ten years’ time, biologists warn, the world’s cloud forests—evergreen mountain forests that are almost permanently shrouded in mist and clouds—may be all but gone.

Coral Reef Paradise Round in Remote Indonesian Islands

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 8, 2001   View Article

Scuba divers, take note: The waters of the Raja Ampat Islands off Indonesia’s province of Irian Jaya may replace heralded Palau as the most species-rich sea in the world.

An international team of marine biologists who visited the Raja Ampats recently to examine the reefs said they found what may be an unparalleled array of species—corals, fishes, and mollusks—including some species never seen before.

Forecast Sees Halt to Population Growth by End of Century

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 6, 2001   View Article

The foreboding threat of world disaster from explosive population growth could turn out to be overly alarmist, say the authors of a new demographic study.

Their forecast shows there’s a high chance that the world’s population will stop growing before the end of the 21st century. It suggests that the total number of people may peak in 70 years or so at about 9 billion people, compared with 6.1 billion today.

Study Paints New Picture of Dinosaur’s Nose

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 2, 2001   View Article

A new study suggests that anyone who sits down to draw a detailed picture of what dinosaurs may have looked like will have to tweak the nose a bit to get it right.

Usually the flesh-covered nasal passages of dinosaurs are shown toward the back of the openings in the nose bone.

Female Lions Are Democratic in Breeding, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 26, 2001   View Article

Motherhood is an equal-opportunity employer for female lions.

A long-term study of lions in Africa shows that the females living among a group of lions consistently produce similar numbers of surviving offspring and raise them collectively.

Book Report: Nature Returns to America’s Cities

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 23, 2001   View Article

The concrete jungle isn’t just for people anymore. Thirty years of good environmental stewardship combined with wildlife’s innate ability to adapt has given rise to a resurgence of nature in America’s urban centers.

In New York City, raccoons have walked through the front door and into the kitchen to raid the refrigerator. In southern California, mountain lions have been seen cooling off under garden sprinklers and breaking into homes near Disneyland. In Chicago, beavers gnaw and fell trees and snarl traffic.

Fossils Challenge Theory of Rapid Animal Evolution in Cambrian

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 20, 2001   View Article

Most major animal groups appear for the first time in the fossil record some 545 million years ago in a relatively short period of time known as the Cambrian explosion. The explanation of this sudden arrival is a scientific conundrum.

The fossil record suggests that exceptional evolutionary activity took place over 10 million years at the base of the Cambrian and generated the ancestors of nearly all the animal groups living on Earth today, as well as others that failed to see modern times.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach