Archive for January, 2006

Meteorite Impact Reformulated Earth’s Crust, Study Shows

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 12, 2006   View Article

About 1.8 billion years ago, a meteorite or comet the size of Mount Everest slammed into what is now Canada.

According to James Mungall, a University of Toronto geologist, the impact turned part of the Earth’s crust inside out and dusted the surface with a rare metal.

Ants Have Teacher-Pupil Relations, Researchers Report

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 11, 2006   View Article

When you were younger, did a family member ever show you how to find the local grocery store? Members of the ant species Temnothorax albipennis have a similar family tradition, according to a new study.

The finding may be the first known example of a teacher-pupil relationship in a nonhuman animal, according to Nigel Franks, a biologist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

Prehistoric Graves Reveal America’s First Baby Boom

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 9, 2006   View Article

A new study of prehistoric cemeteries in North America is adding weight to the theory that the development of agriculture helped fuel baby booms around the world.

According to the theory, populations swell when societies shift from a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle to one based on the more sedentary routine of farming.

Predator Fish Help Coral Reefs Rebound, Study Shows

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 5, 2006   View Article

The return of a top predator in a Bahamas marine reserve is proving unexpectedly beneficial to coral reefs there, according to a new study.

The finding is a relief to scientists, who were concerned that the reserve’s population of predatory Nassau grouper would swell at the expense of the already vulnerable reefs, which are quickly disappearing due to disease, hurricanes, and warming oceans.

Hippo and Tortoise May Find Three’s a Crowd

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 5, 2006   View Article

The strength of a unique male bond between a young hippopotamus and a 130-year-old tortoise will be tested later this spring when conservation workers introduce a female hippo to the mix.

The pending introduction serves as an intriguing plot twist to the unlikely story of a hippo and tortoise brought together at Haller Park wildlife sanctuary in Mombasa, Kenya, in the wake of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean tsunami.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach