Biodiversity

Warming Oceans Put Kink in Food Chain, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 30, 2007   View Article

The growth of tiny plants at the base of the ocean food chain is tightly linked to changes in the climate, according to a recent study.

The finding shows that as temperatures warm, the growth of single-celled ocean plants called phytoplankton slows at Earth’s mid and low latitudes. The plants’ growth increases when the climate cools.

“Weirdest” Animals to Get Conservation Attention

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 16, 2007   View Article

A conservation effort announced today aims to protect some of the world’s oddest and most overlooked animal species.

The Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE) program, led by the Zoological Society of London, focuses on animals that have unique evolutionary histories and face immediate risk of extinction.

52 New Species Found in Borneo, Report Announces

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 19, 2006   View Article

A miniature fish, a tree frog with bright green eyes, and a catfish with a sticky belly are among 52 new species discovered within the past year in Borneo, according to a report released today.

The Southeast Asian island is shared by Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei.

Seafood May Be Gone by 2048, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 2, 2006   View Article

Unless humans act now, seafood may disappear by 2048, concludes the lead author of a new study that paints a grim picture for ocean and human health.

According to the study, the loss of ocean biodiversity is accelerating, and 29 percent of the seafood species humans consume have already crashed. If the long-term trend continues, in 30 years there will be little or no seafood available for sustainable harvest.

Two New Wildlife Parks Created in Congo

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 25, 2006   View Article

The Republic of Congo will set aside up to 3,800 square miles (1 million hectares) of habitat teeming with elephants, chimpanzees, hippos, crocodiles, and some of the highest densities of gorillas on Earth for two new wildlife parks.

The new protected areas will encompass a mosaic of savannas covering ancient sand dunes, riverside forests, and swamp forests.

“Walking” Sharks Among 50 New Species Found in Indonesia Reefs

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 18, 2006   View Article

More than 50 new species have been discovered off the coast of Indonesia, including small, slender-bodied sharks that “walk” with their fins along coral reefs, researchers announced today.

Genetic Family Tree of All Life Is Bearing Fruit

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 6, 2006   View Article

New cures, supercrops, and secrets of evolution may emerge from the fast-growing branches of the “Tree of Life,” scientists say.

The increasing availability of genetic information—and the computer technology to analyze it—is allowing researchers to begin drawing a detailed picture of how life on Earth originated, adapted, and diversified.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach