Evolution

1.8-Million-Year-Old Hominid Jaw Found

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 20, 2003   View Article

Tanzania’s Olduvai Gorge has yielded an impressive pile of fossilized bones and stone tools that may reshuffle the evolutionary tree of the early hominids and shed light on the behavior of some of human kind’s earliest ancestors.

The gorge is most noted for the abundant fossil discoveries of esteemed anthropologists Louis and Mary Leakey from 1959 to 1976 which helped shape modern understanding of human origins.

Dinosaur Tracks Shed Light on Sauropod Evolution

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 30, 2002   View Article

Dinosaur tracks made on the edge of a coastal plain 163 million years ago in middle England are providing a team of researchers with new insights into the evolution and behavior of sauropods.

Sauropods are the group of plant-eating dinosaurs distinguished by their long necks and tails. They include some of the largest creatures ever to walk on Earth.

Fossil of Dog Size Horned Dinosaur Unearthed in China

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 22, 2002   View Article

Researchers have announced their discovery of a very distant cousin to Triceratops, the well-known three-horned dinosaur with a massive bony protrusion behind its skull.

The discovery is an important piece in the evolutionary puzzle of the horned dinosaurs. Although they are considered one of the most diverse groups of dinosaurs, little is known about their early evolution.

Fear of Snakes, Spiders Rooted in Evolution, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: October 4, 2001   View Article

“Aaaaaaaahhhh!!!!!” The mere sight of a snake or spider strikes terror in the hearts of millions of people.

A new study suggests that such fear has been shaped by evolution, stretching back to a time when early mammals had to survive and breed in an environment dominated by reptiles, some of which were deadly.

Oldest Asian Tools Show Early Human Tolerance of Variable Climate

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 26, 2001   View Article

When it’s cold outside, modern humans don a sweater to ward off the chill. But how and when early humans began to develop an ability to cope with different climates has been a great puzzle in the study of human evolution. The answer is important because it suggests when early humans were able to migrate out of tropical Africa and settle all corners of the globe.

Fossils Challenge Theory of Rapid Animal Evolution in Cambrian

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 20, 2001   View Article

Most major animal groups appear for the first time in the fossil record some 545 million years ago in a relatively short period of time known as the Cambrian explosion. The explanation of this sudden arrival is a scientific conundrum.

The fossil record suggests that exceptional evolutionary activity took place over 10 million years at the base of the Cambrian and generated the ancestors of nearly all the animal groups living on Earth today, as well as others that failed to see modern times.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach