Food

Brazil Bug Study May Aid Farmland Preservation

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: October 3, 2002   View Article

Overturn a wet rock or poke into a pile of damp leaf litter, and you may send a mass of tiny creatures known as Collembola jumping for cover.

The world’s most abundant insect (although taxonomists debate if they are true insects), Collembola have been around for at least 400 million years and exist in as many as 100,000 varieties.

Forecast Sees Halt to Population Growth by End of Century

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 6, 2001   View Article

The foreboding threat of world disaster from explosive population growth could turn out to be overly alarmist, say the authors of a new demographic study.

Their forecast shows there’s a high chance that the world’s population will stop growing before the end of the 21st century. It suggests that the total number of people may peak in 70 years or so at about 9 billion people, compared with 6.1 billion today.

High Demand for Tequila Puts Mexico’s Dry Forests at Risk

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 14, 2001   View Article

Since the late 1990s, tequila has moved to the front of the shelf as one of the world’s most popular alcoholic drinks. Behind the scenes, however, the trend is threatening tropical dry forests of Mexico.

The key to preventing that may lie in a bottle of mezcal, a close cousin to tequila, which is produced in limited quantities and is gaining ground as new premium alcohol.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach