World Events

Antarctica Cruise Disaster Raises Tourism Concerns

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 27, 2007   View Article

Cruise ship accidents in Antarctica may be “inevitable,” at least one expert says.

The current surge in polar tourism and a reported increase in icebergs are raising safety and environmental concerns—which were brought boiling to the surface by this past weekend’s sinking of the M.S. Explorer.

London, Tokyo Submerged by Rising Seas – In “Second Life”

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 4, 2007   View Article

Tokyo, Amsterdam, and the entire Mediterranean island of Ibiza were inundated with floodwaters today due to rising sea levels brought on by global warming.

Or at least, that would have been the headline if events in the virtual world Second Life mirrored reality.

“No Two Snowflakes the Same” Likely True, Research Reveals

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 13, 2007   View Article

More than ten feet (three meters) of snow fell last week in parts of upstate New York, and more is forecast for the U.S. Northeast in the coming days.

In all that snow, however, scientists believe the chance that any two flakes are exactly alike is virtually zero.

Hawaiian New Year a Melting Pot of Traditions

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 28, 2006   View Article

The New Year will arrive on the Hawaiian Islands with loads of bang, food, and good luck, according to local experts.

The Pacific Ocean islands are home to a culturally and ethnically diverse group of people that have created a unique set of New Year’s traditions, explained DeSoto Brown, the collection manager of the Bishop Museum archives in Honolulu.

Young Americans Geographically Illiterate, Survey Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 2, 2006   View Article

Young adults in the United States fail to understand the world and their place in it, according to a survey-based report on geographic literacy released today.

Take Iraq, for example. Despite nearly constant news coverage since the war there began in 2003, 63 percent of Americans aged 18 to 24 failed to correctly locate the country on a map of the Middle East. Seventy percent could not find Iran or Israel.

U.S. Not Ready for Fast Spreading Flu, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 3, 2006   View Article

Scientists have used a sophisticated computer model to predict how a deadly flu virus might spread through the United States, and how the disease might respond to efforts to contain it.

The results suggest that the U.S. is prepared to contain a virus with low transmissibility but perhaps not one that spreads more quickly.

Car Free Days Bring Quiet to Communities, Advocates Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 29, 2006   View Article

Beep beep. Vroom vroom. Thump thump.

The constant cacophony of honking horns, roaring engines, and booming car stereos has helped fuel a sixfold increase in noise pollution over the past 15 years that is driving people from cities, according to advocates for peace and quiet.

Wouldn’t it be nice, they ask, if cars were on the fringe of our daily lives?
To help find an answer, “car-free day” events held in a handful of cities across the U.S. are giving urban dwellers a taste for life with fewer—and in some cases no—cars.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach