World Events

Youth Scholarships Raise Awareness of Kyoto Prizes

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 23, 2004   View Article

For the past three years, San Diego, California, has played host to an annual symposium to mark the Kyoto Prizes. Somewhat akin to the Nobel Prizes, the awards are presented by the Japan-based Inamori Foundation to honor scientific, cultural, and spiritual achievement.

The annual symposia gather prizewinners, scholars, and the general public to discuss the laureates’ achievements.

Where Is Amelia Earhart? – Three Theories

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 15, 2003   View Article

In the early morning hours of July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart was scheduled to land her airplane on the tiny Pacific Ocean island of Howland just north of the Equator. She never arrived.

Her fate remains one of aviation’s greatest unsolved mysteries. Organizations and researchers have spent millions of dollars investigating the case and several books have been published that examine the differing theories.

Monumental Quilt Honors 9/11 Victims

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 10, 2003   View Article

She watched Flight 175 ram the north tower of the World Trade Center and, like most TV viewers, sat stunned. Minutes later, the smoldering south tower collapsed. Then word came that Flight 77 had struck the Pentagon. Then the north tower crumbled. In Pennsylvania, dust settled around the crater left by Flight 93.

Jeannie Ammermann said the tragic events of September 11, 2001, changed her life forever. The next day, fidgety, she sat at her desk at a real estate office in Naples, Florida, and jotted down ideas of what she could do for the victims’ families.

Forecast Sees Halt to Population Growth by End of Century

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 6, 2001   View Article

The foreboding threat of world disaster from explosive population growth could turn out to be overly alarmist, say the authors of a new demographic study.

Their forecast shows there’s a high chance that the world’s population will stop growing before the end of the 21st century. It suggests that the total number of people may peak in 70 years or so at about 9 billion people, compared with 6.1 billion today.

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