Pollution

Oceans Suffer Attention Deficit in Journals, Experts Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 19, 2003   View Article

The world’s oceans are in crisis. Pollution, overfishing, invasive species, habitat destruction, and a myriad of other human impacts are impeding the oceans’ ability to feed us, control the weather, and maintain Earth’s chemical balance.

Despite the human race’s dependence on the oceans for survival, however, attention to marine conservation science lags far behind that paid to conservation of firm ground, according to Phillip Levin, a marine scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington.

Cousteau Finds “Horrifying” Trash on Desert Islands

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 28, 2003   View Article

Derelict fishing nets, plastic bottles, cigarette lighters, television tubes, spray cans, broken toys, and thousands of other pieces of plastic and non-biodegradable junk converge on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands every year, scarring a seascape nearly void of people with tons of human waste.

“It’s absolutely horrifying the scope of seeing it uncontained out here and definitely impacting the environment,” said Jean-Michel Cousteau in an e-mail to National Geographic News sent from the Searcher. “Every time we go ashore, we are startled and shocked by the amount of debris that systematically litters the coastlines and reefs.”

Caribbean Corals in Dire Trouble, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 22, 2003   View Article

Corals are rapidly disappearing from reefs in the Caribbean and unless conservation actions are taken immediately the trend may prove irreversible, according to British scientists who performed the first ever basin-wide survey of coral reef decline.

“We all knew it was bad, but not this bad,” said Isabelle Côté, a biologist at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England.

Cloud Forest Fading in the Mist, Their Treasures Little Known

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 13, 2001   View Article

They are nature’s “water towers,” providing billions of gallons of fresh, clean, filtered water. They are home to thousands of indigenous peoples, and storehouses of biodiversity, at least 80 percent of which has not yet been catalogued.

Yet in as little as ten years’ time, biologists warn, the world’s cloud forests—evergreen mountain forests that are almost permanently shrouded in mist and clouds—may be all but gone.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach